Baptism Bear

Super-sweet bear that I made for our godson’s baptism.  I hadn’t made a stuffed animal since I was a kid, so it was kind of a new project for me.  I scoured Pinterest for stuffed animal patterns, but came up empty-handed.  I went to the quilting store, and didn’t see anything I liked there.  Finally settled on this pattern (5461) from Simplicity to make the bear:

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Of course I had specific fabric that I had in mind to use.  Remember the baby quilt I made a while back?  Well, turns out I had enough of the gray minky material from the back of the quilt for the bear,

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and enough of my leftover bridesmaid dress for the ears and soles of the feet!

It turned out to be a much simpler project than I imagined.  In fact, it was down-right quick and easy to sew this bear together.  And I LOVE (LOVE!) the way it turned out.  So sweet.  IMG_0583

I think the hardest parts were hand-embroidering the nose and the extra embroidery I did on the soles of the feet.  But I love it.  And I should probably make my own boys a teddy bear, but they already have their stuffies!

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Cheers to Sammy!

~Ingrid

Back to School

Our oldest son started preschool this fall! We are so excited for him. We fell in love with the Montessori program when we toured the school last spring, and couldn’t wait for him to get going.

As it was his first day of school (ever!), I felt like he needed a little something special from his mama. Enter Made-by-Rae’s Toddler backpack.  I had visions of grandeur about sewing this for him weeks before school started, but (as always) the time got away from me, and there I sat with my fabric and new pattern on the night before school.  I was only going to get as far as I could get, but by 10pm, I was so close to being done.  By 11, I was done…until I realized I had put the straps on backwards.  By 11:45, I was finally done, and ready to send my Big Little boy off to his first day of school.

sock monkey backpack It really is the perfect size for a toddler.  Not too big, not too small.  Just right (apparently he’s a boy goldilocks?)….

IMG_0081No, we didn’t send him to school in his pajamas.  At least we haven’t yet.  That day might come.

IMG_0064Sock monkey fabric from JoAnn fabrics, Red dot fabric (Robert Kaufman, I believe) from the Sewing Palace.  I did have to line the front and back with a heavier fabric to make it a little sturdier.  I didn’t fuse it into place, just basted the lighter fabric to the heavier fabric before sewing the pattern pieces together.

IMG_0062He is still loving his backpack three weeks in.  Success!  And well worth the lack of sleep to see a smile on my boy’s face!

IMG_0077~Ingrid

Craft Table Tutorial

Well, after months of Pinteresting all of the web’s fabulous craft tables, I finally made my own!  I had an idea of what I wanted, it was just a matter of getting it done (and having someplace to put it).

On my wish-list:

  • Storage
  • Counter height surface
  • Laminate counter top to pin and cut fabric
  • Big enough to fit my large cutting mat for quilting

On John’s list:

  • Roll away or fold-away in case we have company and need to actually use our guest room

I managed to get everything on BOTH of our wish lists, without compromising on size.  I am loving it!  And loving my ingenuity!!!  There were no directions out there, so here is my “craft table tutorial”.

finished table

Materials:

  • Laminate counter top to the dimensions that you desire.
  • 2 cube storage shelves.  Mine are 2 wide by 3 high.
  • 2 pieces of scrap wood that are relatively flat and about the same width as your storage cube pieces.
  • Wood screws
  • Brackets or clasps

I ordered the countertop from Ikea.  I was going to have one custom made, but thought I would give the pre made one a shot…the price was right.  I believe I got the cube storage shelves from Target, but any big box store will have them.

Assembly:

As mentioned before, I wanted the table to fold or roll.  I thought about how I would make that happen, and decided it would be easiest to have the countertop come off, when needed.  Here’s how to achieve that with clasps or brackets similar to what you’d find underneath a dining room table.

Lay out your counter top, wrong-side up.

Countertop

Mark where you would like to have the “legs” of your craft table by placing the top piece of the storage cube on the countertop.

As you can see, I am measuring the placement of the unassembled storage cube.  Draw a line along the innermost edge of the storage cube.countertop with board

Place the piece of scrap wood along the line that you just drew.  Screw into place.placing bracing

I didn’t have a piece of scrap wood, it was decorative trim.  It was basically the same dimension on the fat side of the trim as my shelving unit, so I used it.

Repeat the process for the other end of the craft table so that you have two pieces that will brace your shelving units:

Bracings

Assemble the clasp units onto both the bracing and the shelving unit.  Follow the instructions that came with your clasp if need be.  I used 4 clasps for stability.

clasp

4 clasps

Your removable countertop is now finished.  Assemble the shelving units using the instructions they came with.

Shelving unitYou can see the half of the clasp that has already been attached to the shelving unit (above).

Move your craft table to the desired location prior to assembling it.

Attach the countertop, and begin crafting!  finished table

craft table

I am happy to say that my husband had no part in the “wood working” on this project.  I can’t remember where he was, but the kids were in bed early, so I pulled out the saw and the drill and got to work!  We women can do this stuff, too!

Cheers!

Ingrid

Summer Sewing

When I found out that I was going to be the mom of boys, I was a little bummed that I wasn’t going to have girls to sew for.  The clothes for girls are SO CUTE.  The dresses with ruffles and bows.  The tutus and matching onesies.  The baby leg warmers and hair bows.  You get the idea.  Being the mom of boys, I have dressed them in comfortable clothes that are easy to change.  Sure, they have their dress-up duds that keep them looking cute, but our day-to-day look is very easy.  Our three year old picks out (whatever) he wants to wear.  Our one year old is put in something easy.  We are busy people!

I had a lot of fun sewing for my boys over the fourth of July weekend.  They were in need of some shorts with the weather in the mid to high 80s.  And do you know what?  They sure looked cute when I was done with them!  Not ruffles and bows cute, but an awesome boy cute.

I love the shorts that Dana has designed over at MADE.  I bought the Kid Shorts Pattern with some specific fabric in mind to try it out.

G shorts

The first pair, one for each boy, was made from Timeless Treasures Retro Geek print.  I picked up the fabric while we were on vacation.  I absolutely adore it!

flat front short

I made the flat-front version of the Kid Short pattern.  I didn’t change anything about the pattern this go-around, nor did I measure my kids’ waists.  I just made the pattern in their corresponding commercial size.

F retro geek

They fit great!  Of course, I had to appliqué a matching shirt.

IMG_0430This model was getting a little frisky with the camera:

retro geek shortsI love the pockets on those shorts.

The next set that I made was from the same pattern, but just the plain shorts.  Fabric from JoAnns, shirts from JC Penney.

superhero shortsThe super hero shorts.  This model would only pose with food.  My other model was a bit uncooperative.

The pattern was easy to follow and simple to sew.  I will be making it again, probably for years to come as it goes up to a size 8 or 10!  I see more shorts in our future!

Cheers!

~Ingrid

 

Spring Top Sewalong

I have been reading Made By Rae‘s blog for several years now.  She always has some awesome projects going on, patterns to download and tutorials to follow.

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This year I decided to participate in the Spring Top Sewalong!  It’s basically an excuse to sew a new top for yourself….not that I need an excuse….but it definitely gave me a goal!

I have had this pattern in my stash for a year or so, hoping to get to it someday:

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I really liked both the short and long sleeved version, as well as the skirt.  I could see myself wearing something like that to work, if I weren’t sitting with my legs spread-eagle every day while I work on patients.  The skirt–not so practical for me.  The blouse–it’s a go!

I ordered some tan lace from Fashion Fabrics Club that would go with a floral fabric that I purchased from JoAnn’s.  I have used Fashion Fabrics Club before, and even ordered the silk chiffon for my wedding dress from them.  The prices are reasonable, but the shipping seems to take forever (yes, I am spoiled by Amazon Prime).

The pattern itself was easy to follow and simple to put together.  I did French seams and serging on raw edges to finish my seams.  (The floral would have freyed if I hadn’t done something to finish the edges.)

New look pattern

The fit is pretty darn good.  I probably could have gone a size up just for a bit more room, though.  (I am still adjusting to my post-babies-figure and sizing, even though my youngest is over a year!)

Spring blouse

Future adjustments to the pattern: give myself a bit more ease in the sleeves. They are a bit tight if I bring my arms forward.

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However, I like how it fits and have worn it several times already!  All-in-all a great top and fairly easy to make!

~Ingrid

T-shirt into Baby Gown Refashion

I am sure that you have gathered that I enjoy making things for the babies and kiddos in my life.  I absolutely adore something handmade for a brand-new baby!  Whether it’s clothes, hats, burp cloths, car seat covers…I love it all.  Not to mention that most baby projects are pretty fast and easy, which works for me these days!

One of John’s band member’s is expecting his second child in May (or rather, his wife is expecting…).  The little pup’s gender is currently a surprise.  I wanted a gift that was fairly gender neutral, but definitely wanted to use a Clinton’s T-shirt.

I found the Rockin’ Baby Gown Tutorial awhile back and knew exactly which shirt I was going to use for it.  This is a great tutorial from thismamamakesstuff.com.  It was easy to follow and the pattern didn’t have any hiccups.

I used my Sellout Tshirt, but of course didn’t take a before photo.  (Shameless plug:  you can find your own copy of Sellout at www.clintonsband.com)

But here’s the after:

Sellout gownThe main body is from the original t-shirt.  The blue sleeves and collar are from a second t-shirt.

Gown backThe pattern came with the fold-over sleeve modification, which is perfect for new babies so that they don’t scratch themselves.

IMG_0073Just a close-up of the sleeve.  I used a twin needle to hem the sleeve and neck, which gives it a nice professional-looking finish.  The blue material was a little more difficult to sew because it stretched a lot.  I had to decrease my presser foot tension to feed it more evenly.

Folded sleevesI modified the neck edge slightly to accommodate the contrast knit ribbing instead of hemming the neck edge.  Other garment finishes included serging the edges after sewing the seams at the proper seam allowance.

All in all, an easy tutorial to follow, and great up-cycle.  The finished product is also awesome!  I loved these type of gowns when my boys were newborns!  They made middle of the night diaper changes super easy–no snaps or zippers to deal with!

~Ingrid

 

Sew-eet Tooth Creations Labels

All labelsIt took me awhile to get to where I am at.  And not just in life, but here on the blog.  It was before Finn was born that I thought about sewing and possibly selling my finished products.  I can remember flying home with John from our honeymoon, talking about what was next in our lives.  Of course, kiddos were on the horizon, but we both need creative outlets to help us find our zen.  Mine is sewing and other crafts, John’s is writing and music.  (And I’m the one that started a blog? Hmmm….)  Having just moved back to Helena from Portland, I realized that there was a niche for handmade goods.  This was years before Frayed Sew was even in existence.  We brainstormed where in Helena one might even think about selling handmade garments, coats, or women’s apparel.  That would be a challenge.  I dabbled in pattern making.  I read books about it.  I bought software to draft patterns.  I soon realized that it would be a full-time job to even think about trying to sell custom or handmade coats and/or apparel!

Well, the years have gone by since I thought much about selling or custom making anything.  I still need my creative outlet, just as much as I need time with my kids and husband.  With dentistry full-time, two kiddos, and trying to get back into some semblance of a fitness routine, carving out time for sewing and crafting often takes a back burner.  With one exception.  I always try to give something handmade or created when it comes to gifts.

After gifting enough burp cloths, car seat covers, bibs, blankets and such to friends for baby showers, my mind started wandering back to branding my creations.  About six or eight months ago, John and I were sitting around (getting the kids ready for bed), and I told him about wanting to make labels.  My only hitch was, if I was going to make labels, I wanted to have a good name.  Something that embodied me, but also was fairly marketable, should I choose to do that in the future.  We brainstormed name-based labels or using my initials, dental monikers, or that sort of thing.   Sew-eet Tooth came out somewhere in the brainstorming session and I was immediately in love.  It was everything…dentistry, sewing, my love of sugar (yes, too!)…all in one.  The hardest part was deciding what to put after Sew-eet Tooth.  Nothing? Designs? Garments? Creations?  I originally liked Designs, but when I wrote out the initials, STD, it really didn’t sit well with me. (Go figure). So Creations it became! STC worked.  Sew-eet Tooth Creations.

Next up was researching clothing labels.  I read on MADE ages ago how she had her clothing labels made.  It seemed pretty straight forward, I just needed to get a little further in my process.  I worked through a graphic designer to get my Sew-eet Tooth logo up and running.  I designed it with a wrapped hard candy in mind, but then altered the ends of the wrapper to be a tooth…and voila!

CandyOnlyLogoI used Clothing Labels 4U, and they were awesome.  As soon as you make contact, they send you samples of different types of labels.  Once you figure out what you want, including label types, colors, etc, the process is fast and easy!  

All labelsI decided to get two types of labels in a couple of colors.

Logo labelOne with the logo on it, finished on all sides.

Candy labelsI also did the candy only in two colors.

Blue candyThe candy labels are end-folded so they can be sewn into a side seam.  I love them all!

If you have ever thought about making the investment in labels, Clothing Labels 4U is a great choice!  I am sure there are other options out there, but the quality is top notch with these!  They look professional, but the design is whimsical.  I can’t wait to sew them into more projects!

~Ingrid