Christmas Stockings

I made some beautiful quilted stockings for a friend, and a couple for a gift exchange.  They turned out well, and are very easy to make! In my last post I said that I would get you directions for how to make your own quilted stockings, so here we go:Christmas stockingsMaterials:

  • Numerous fabrics to strip quilt the stocking front (a fat quarter of each is sufficient)
  • 1/3 yard of material for stocking back
  • 1/3 yard of material for lining
  • 1/3 yard of batting
  • Stocking to trace for a pattern or download one from the web

First, cut out strips of fabric for the strip-quilted front of the stocking.  Mine were two inch strips.  For my stocking pattern to fit, I needed 13 strips.

Lay out the strips and then sew together using a 1/4″ seam.

strip quiltingPress the seam allowance one direction, just to make it easier to sew.back of strip quilting

After you have enough strips for your stocking pattern to fit, cut out your stocking front.  Remember to leave a 1/4″ seam allowance if your pattern doesn’t include it.Stocking frontCut out the remaining pieces for the stocking so that it can be assembled:  1 stocking back, 2 batting and 2 lining.

All pieces

Arrange your “outside” stocking pieces so that they can be sewn together:  1 layer of batting, topped with the stocking back, topped with the stocking front (right sides together) and topped with the final layer of batting.Stocking layersSew together using a 1/4″ seam.  Trim/clip curves.  SewnTurn right side out and iron.right side outNext, assemble the lining.  Place the lining pieces right sides together and sew using a 1/4″ seam allowance.  On one side of the stocking, leave a 3-5″ gap.liningLeave the lining as is, and do not turn right side out at this point.  Stuff the outside of the stocking into the lining.  Right sides should be together.  IMG_0975Line up the top edges so that they can be sewn together.  If you want to add a ribbon or bias tape to hang the stocking, do so now.  The looped part will be placed between the lining and the quilted layer, with the loop pointed down and the ends of the loop into the seam.  Match seams and pin into place.Line up edgesSew around the edge, using a 1/4″ seam allowance.  Reinforce seam where ribbon or bias tape hanger is located in the seam.Sewing edgesTurn right side out using the gap that you left in the stocking lining.  Lining and stockingHand sew the opening closed.  Iron the lining flat, and then insert into the “outside” of the stocking.  Iron again, and you are done!Christmas stockingsSuch a simple, but beautiful way to decorate for Christmas.  And functional, too!

A couple of notes:  The outside could be more elaborate with quilted blocks or even an appliquéd design.  The assembly would still be the same after the front of the stocking was completed.

I also added my label to the inside of the stocking, rather than drawing attention to it on the outside.  I sewed it into place prior to assembling the lining.  One could also add a secret pocket to the lining for money or other Christmas treasures.  The sky’s the limit!

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

~IngridSanta Pic

Craft Table Tutorial

Well, after months of Pinteresting all of the web’s fabulous craft tables, I finally made my own!  I had an idea of what I wanted, it was just a matter of getting it done (and having someplace to put it).

On my wish-list:

  • Storage
  • Counter height surface
  • Laminate counter top to pin and cut fabric
  • Big enough to fit my large cutting mat for quilting

On John’s list:

  • Roll away or fold-away in case we have company and need to actually use our guest room

I managed to get everything on BOTH of our wish lists, without compromising on size.  I am loving it!  And loving my ingenuity!!!  There were no directions out there, so here is my “craft table tutorial”.

finished table

Materials:

  • Laminate counter top to the dimensions that you desire.
  • 2 cube storage shelves.  Mine are 2 wide by 3 high.
  • 2 pieces of scrap wood that are relatively flat and about the same width as your storage cube pieces.
  • Wood screws
  • Brackets or clasps

I ordered the countertop from Ikea.  I was going to have one custom made, but thought I would give the pre made one a shot…the price was right.  I believe I got the cube storage shelves from Target, but any big box store will have them.

Assembly:

As mentioned before, I wanted the table to fold or roll.  I thought about how I would make that happen, and decided it would be easiest to have the countertop come off, when needed.  Here’s how to achieve that with clasps or brackets similar to what you’d find underneath a dining room table.

Lay out your counter top, wrong-side up.

Countertop

Mark where you would like to have the “legs” of your craft table by placing the top piece of the storage cube on the countertop.

As you can see, I am measuring the placement of the unassembled storage cube.  Draw a line along the innermost edge of the storage cube.countertop with board

Place the piece of scrap wood along the line that you just drew.  Screw into place.placing bracing

I didn’t have a piece of scrap wood, it was decorative trim.  It was basically the same dimension on the fat side of the trim as my shelving unit, so I used it.

Repeat the process for the other end of the craft table so that you have two pieces that will brace your shelving units:

Bracings

Assemble the clasp units onto both the bracing and the shelving unit.  Follow the instructions that came with your clasp if need be.  I used 4 clasps for stability.

clasp

4 clasps

Your removable countertop is now finished.  Assemble the shelving units using the instructions they came with.

Shelving unitYou can see the half of the clasp that has already been attached to the shelving unit (above).

Move your craft table to the desired location prior to assembling it.

Attach the countertop, and begin crafting!  finished table

craft table

I am happy to say that my husband had no part in the “wood working” on this project.  I can’t remember where he was, but the kids were in bed early, so I pulled out the saw and the drill and got to work!  We women can do this stuff, too!

Cheers!

Ingrid

Applique T-shirt Tutorial

I am posting today about how to make an appliquéd T-shirt.  It’s pretty easy to do, and doesn’t necessarily require sewing.  I usually sew around the designs that I put on, but if you choose the right bonding, you don’t have to.

GoCats Applique

Materials:

  • T-shirt
  • Fabric scraps for design
  • Adhesive–I use Heat N Bond Lite because I sew around it.  You could also use Heat N Bond Ultra if you didn’t want to sew around it.
  • A design to appliqué

First, draw or print a design from it’s source (the internet).  Make sure that it will fit across your T-shirt, especially if you are sewing for kids.

Go catsAs you can see, mine is a sports logo from the internet.  (Go Cats!)  If you want the orientation the same on the T-shirt, turn the design over and trace it.  If you don’t care about mirroring your object, feel free to skip the next step.

TracingTrace the outline of the design in pen so that it will show through the adhesive.  I am planning on layering this with two fabrics, so I have two outlines to trace.

Trace onto adhesiveTrace the design onto your adhesive, allowing for a small border around the design when you cut it out.  You are tracing on the paper side of the adhesive.

Cut out tracingCut out the designs, leaving a small border around each.  This helps to ensure that the entire design will be well-bonded to your fabric appliqué.

Bonding designBond the design to the wrong side of your fabric following the manufacturer’s directions.  Allow it to cool.

Cut our your designCut out your design (on the lines) and remove the paper backing from the adhesive.

IMG_0032After removing the paper backing, place the fabric design on the T-shirt where you want it.  Iron in place, following the manufacturer’s directions again.

ironing imageI am layering my designs.  I ironed the first design (blue) in place, and then placed the yellow on top and bonded it in place.

If you are not planning on sewing around your design, you are done!  If you are, sew around the design following the contours.  A decorative stitch or zig zag stitch works best.  I prefer a blanket stitch on mine because I know where the needle will end up after each portion of the stitch, making it more accurate in my hands.  (Yes, I am type A.)

GoCats AppliqueAfter sewing around the border, you are done!  Put on willing recipient and repeat after me:  Go CATS!!

IMG_0042IMG_0051This is Finn’s second Go Cats shirt…He out grew the first!

Happy crafting!

~Ingrid