2015 in Review

Yes, it’s February.  I have a million reasons why I haven’t posted in 9 months, but I’m sure we all have a million reasons why we don’t keep up with everything in our lives all the time.  I’ll try to post more this year.

Last spring, I decided to train for an Ironman 70.3.  It took up a lot of my free time that is usually reserved for sewing.  The race was in August in Lake Stevens, WA.  I trained with a good friend.  We took selfies biking 40 miles before work, swam in lakes, and raced until we almost dropped.  Going into it, I thought I’d do one and be done, but now I am planning on doing another 70.3 in June.  It’s addicting.  (For those who don’t know, an Ironman 70.3 is a 1.2 mile swim, 56 mile bike, and 13.1 mile run…and it’s as crazy as it sounds.) I had some serious bike envy at the race with all of the NICE bikes there.  But at the end of the day, it’s a hobby, just like my sewing.  I don’t need a seven thousand dollar bike or sewing machine to get the job done, but boy, they sure look (and I’m sure function) nice!

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I did end up doing some sewing throughout the year, I just didn’t find the time to post it.  Here’s my year in review in pictures:

Numerous Peekaboo Alex & Anna Winter PJ’s:

 

And several Peekaboo Lullaby Baby gowns created for gifts:

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And a ruffled diaper cover, appliquéd onesie, and crochet hat, also for a baby gift:

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The ruffled diaper pattern is a Tie Dye Diva pattern from Craftsy, I believe.  The crochet beanie is a modified pattern from Inner Hooker, which can be found on Etsy.

That about wraps up my sewing for 2015.  I started making a tree skirt at Christmas time, but have yet to finish it.  It will be lovely once it’s done, but it still needs to be quilted.

I believe that’s about it!  Shoot me questions in the comments if you want!

Ingrid

 

New Headboard!

Have you seen those cool headboards on Pinterest?  Earlier this summer, my Pinterest feed had several examples of awesome, padded headboards with tutorials.

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 6.17.56 AMpadded headboard exampleAfter seeing a few, I knew I needed one.  I found some awesome floral fabric on Fabric.com, purchased it, and then let it sit on my fabric shelf for a few months.

After awhile, I decided our bedroom needed a makeover.  It was looking a little drab, to say the least.  Old bedroomWe’re pretty simplistic when it comes to furniture and decorating, but this was getting a little old.  So off I went to Lowe’s to pick out some new paint colors.  I didn’t even realize our walls were gray until I started painting the new paint on!

cream against grayI even painted the ceiling and took down the old ceiling fan.IMG_0657And added an accent wall to make the headboard pop!

IMG_0667At this point, the headboard was already made, but I’ll get to that soon.IMG_0670New ceiling fan!  Good bye 1980’s ceiling fan!IMG_0668Our awesome new paint colors!

Okay, now onto what you’ve been waiting for: the headboard!  I could do this as a tutorial, but I’ll walk you through the steps with pictures and minimal captioning.

IMG_0942The finished product.  So happy with it, even if my mom says it looks a little hippy.IMG_0685First things first, deciding on the dimensions of the headboard, and shaping the corners.  I used 1/2″ plywood for this project.IMG_0686Cut your first corner, and then just flip it over and draw a line for the opposite.  I used a jig saw to make the cuts.IMG_0688Finished cutting the top of the headboard.IMG_0687Next I marked where I was going to put the tufting, and drilled some large pilot holes to make threading the buttons easy.IMG_0689Time to pad the headboard!  I used a cheap foam mattress topper, and covered it with batting, and then stapled it in place.IMG_0690Cut off the excess…it doesn’t have to be pretty at this point.  I repeated the process with the fabric, but on a clean work surface.  IMG_0936Don’t mind the legs on the headboard just yet…we’ll get to that.  I apparently forgot to take a picture of the covered headboard back, but you can see how much I overlapped the fabric here.

Next I added the covered buttons for tufting.  (I also forgot to take pictures of this!)  I used upholstery thread, waxed it so that it would stay better, and threaded my covered buttons through the pre-drilled pilot holes.  John helped me staple them in place on the back.IMG_0934Then we added the 2×4 legs to the headboard.  You could also just hang your headboard on the wall if you didn’t want to add legs and attach it to your bed frame.IMG_0937I covered the legs with a little foam…you know, so it wouldn’t knock against the wall, if you know what I mean 😉IMG_0938Finally, I covered the raw edges with an old sheet, just to make it look pretty.  Not that anybody will see it…IMG_0940John attached it to the bed frame with a couple of screws with washers.  It’s pretty darn secure.IMG_0942Yay!  It’s finished!IMG_0941You can find more detailed tutorials on how to make your own padded headboard by searching the web or on Pinterest.  As far as expenses go, I think I spent $50 on fabric, $25 on wood and screws, another $25 on batting and foam, and $15 on buttons and upholstery thread.  Not too shabby for a new headboard!

Happy crafting!  Cheers!

~Ingrid

Baptism Bear

Super-sweet bear that I made for our godson’s baptism.  I hadn’t made a stuffed animal since I was a kid, so it was kind of a new project for me.  I scoured Pinterest for stuffed animal patterns, but came up empty-handed.  I went to the quilting store, and didn’t see anything I liked there.  Finally settled on this pattern (5461) from Simplicity to make the bear:

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Of course I had specific fabric that I had in mind to use.  Remember the baby quilt I made a while back?  Well, turns out I had enough of the gray minky material from the back of the quilt for the bear,

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and enough of my leftover bridesmaid dress for the ears and soles of the feet!

It turned out to be a much simpler project than I imagined.  In fact, it was down-right quick and easy to sew this bear together.  And I LOVE (LOVE!) the way it turned out.  So sweet.  IMG_0583

I think the hardest parts were hand-embroidering the nose and the extra embroidery I did on the soles of the feet.  But I love it.  And I should probably make my own boys a teddy bear, but they already have their stuffies!

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Cheers to Sammy!

~Ingrid

Craft Table Tutorial

Well, after months of Pinteresting all of the web’s fabulous craft tables, I finally made my own!  I had an idea of what I wanted, it was just a matter of getting it done (and having someplace to put it).

On my wish-list:

  • Storage
  • Counter height surface
  • Laminate counter top to pin and cut fabric
  • Big enough to fit my large cutting mat for quilting

On John’s list:

  • Roll away or fold-away in case we have company and need to actually use our guest room

I managed to get everything on BOTH of our wish lists, without compromising on size.  I am loving it!  And loving my ingenuity!!!  There were no directions out there, so here is my “craft table tutorial”.

finished table

Materials:

  • Laminate counter top to the dimensions that you desire.
  • 2 cube storage shelves.  Mine are 2 wide by 3 high.
  • 2 pieces of scrap wood that are relatively flat and about the same width as your storage cube pieces.
  • Wood screws
  • Brackets or clasps

I ordered the countertop from Ikea.  I was going to have one custom made, but thought I would give the pre made one a shot…the price was right.  I believe I got the cube storage shelves from Target, but any big box store will have them.

Assembly:

As mentioned before, I wanted the table to fold or roll.  I thought about how I would make that happen, and decided it would be easiest to have the countertop come off, when needed.  Here’s how to achieve that with clasps or brackets similar to what you’d find underneath a dining room table.

Lay out your counter top, wrong-side up.

Countertop

Mark where you would like to have the “legs” of your craft table by placing the top piece of the storage cube on the countertop.

As you can see, I am measuring the placement of the unassembled storage cube.  Draw a line along the innermost edge of the storage cube.countertop with board

Place the piece of scrap wood along the line that you just drew.  Screw into place.placing bracing

I didn’t have a piece of scrap wood, it was decorative trim.  It was basically the same dimension on the fat side of the trim as my shelving unit, so I used it.

Repeat the process for the other end of the craft table so that you have two pieces that will brace your shelving units:

Bracings

Assemble the clasp units onto both the bracing and the shelving unit.  Follow the instructions that came with your clasp if need be.  I used 4 clasps for stability.

clasp

4 clasps

Your removable countertop is now finished.  Assemble the shelving units using the instructions they came with.

Shelving unitYou can see the half of the clasp that has already been attached to the shelving unit (above).

Move your craft table to the desired location prior to assembling it.

Attach the countertop, and begin crafting!  finished table

craft table

I am happy to say that my husband had no part in the “wood working” on this project.  I can’t remember where he was, but the kids were in bed early, so I pulled out the saw and the drill and got to work!  We women can do this stuff, too!

Cheers!

Ingrid